My collection of Neil Gaiman books, including Fragile Things, Smoke and Mirrors, Neverwhere, Anansi Boys, Good Omens, Good Fairies of New York, Stardust and again, Fragile Things. The Sandman, Volume 1 was not there and American Gods seems to be missing.
My collection of Neil Gaiman books, including Fragile Things, Smoke and Mirrors, Neverwhere, Anansi Boys, Good Omens, Good Fairies of New York, Stardust and again, Fragile Things. The Sandman, Volume 1 was not there and American Gods seems to be missing.
I went into Barnes and Noble in Green Bay with my sister this weekend to look for Volume 2 in The Sandman Series, as well as paruse the other books they have to offer.

My instinct is to sprint past all of the books and Nooks into my little sci-fi/fantasy corner that also has the art books as well as the manga and other graphic novels. But right as we walked through the first set of double doors, we saw a collection of classic books redone in bonded leather with amazing cover art, and were stopped in our tracks. There it was, sitting on a small display with other classic books and some contemporary too... Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and other stories by Lewis Carroll, all in bright pink and black with a touch of white and gold. And at $20, it was a must have. But by the end of the shopping experience, I decided it was a bad idea to pick that one up first. It made the small collection of books I toted around the store significantly heavier (on the plus side, my arms got a baby workout).

I then proceeded on browsing the store as I usually do. I always check first to see if there is a Neil Gaiman book on the shelf that I don't have (if I'm not stopped dead in my tracks before I even completely enter the store). This time, I was in luck and found, The Graveyard Book. Score!

I then checked out the World of Warcraft books to see which of those I don't have. Thrall, was the only one I have to get. I carried it around for the shopping experience and then after looking at what I had in my hands before check out, ultimately decided to get it on a different trip.

Next, it was off to the graphic novels to find Volume 2. I came up empty handed with that one after searching through the comics and graphic novels several times (and also checking the in-store computer search).

I decided to look through the full shelf just to see what they had as far as graphic novels since I was enjoying the current one so much (I finished it Monday night and I'll have to find the next one soon). I saw some that I expected to be there - Thor, The Avengers, Batman, TMNT, etc. - and then other graphic novels I've heard about - The Walking Dead, Sin City - but then I saw something that shocked me. One series was by Stephen King... I figured it might not be that odd since I was already looking for another graphic novel that was written by a current writer (Gaiman) who has written many novels (and is still writing) too. But then I saw one on the shelf that blew my mind. The Hobbit: A Graphic Novel, a work of literature, was on the shelf next to super heroes, villians and other comic books, sitting right next to all the manga.

My mind started to jump from thought to thought about the situation in front of me, and the questions started building. How could they do that to a novel that is around 300 pages, depending on the size of the book? Is this a way to get a "younger" generation to read the classics? Is this a good thing or a bad thing? Does the "younger" generation even know what comic books are? And if they do, do they even read them in this time of technology with iPads, Kindles and Nooks? Can you even read a comic book in e-form? If so, is it even practical?

I guess all I can leave you with for now is a quote from the great Chuck Finster, "Nobody knows." Actually, I'm sure someone does. So, give me a clue as to what is going on here or let me know what you think about this situation.

Next week I'll be writing about something new and exciting - or at least something fun.